Repetitions and Muscle Hypertrophy

December 2000 Strength and Conditioning Journal 67© National Strength & Conditioning AssociationVolume 22, Number 6, page 67-69

Brad Schoenfeld, CSCSPersonal Training Center for WomenScarsdale, New YorkKeywords: repetitions; muscular mass.

MANY EXERCISE-RELATEDfactors influence muscular mass.Among them is repetition range-the amount of repetitions performedduring a set. Unfortunately,this is one of the mostmisunderstood aspects of training.Most people realize that theuse of a high number of repetitions(in excess of 15 per set) issuboptimal for increasing muscularmass. The reason for this is simple: during a high-repetitionset, the weights used aren’t heavyenough to innervate the highestthreshold motor units.

Thesemotor units control the fasttwitch,type IIB fibers-the onesthat have the greatest potentialfor growth. Rather, the majority ofwork is accomplished by slowtwitchtype I fibers, which are fatigueresistant but have a limitedability to hypertrophy.

Thus, althoughhigh-repetition training isan excellent approach for heighteninglocal muscular enduranceand improving the quality of muscletissue, it produces only minimalgains in muscular size.

On the other hand, there is aprevailing misconception that inorder to get big, one needs to trainlike a powerlifter, using extremelyheavy weights and low repetitions(less than 5 per set). It is commonto witness an aspiring bodybuilderload up the bar and performsets of squats or benchpresses at or near his or her 1-repetition maximum.

This approach,however, is contrary toestablished principles of exercisephysiology. For a variety of reasons,a moderate-repetitionscheme (approximately 8 to 10repetitions per set) is the decidedlybetter choice for achieving optimalgains in muscular mass.

First, training in a moderaterepetitionrange stimulates theactivation of a maximum numberof muscle fibers. This is becauseof the size principle of muscle recruitment,which dictates thatmotor units are innervated in anorderly fashion. Smaller motorunits are activated first. As a setbecomes more intense, largermotor units are progressivelybrought into play until all availablefibers are recruited.

This isthe general pattern of recruitmentseen during moderate-repetitiontraining, and it allows the fullspectrum of fibers to exert force.Alternatively, because lowrepetitiontraining requires an explosiveconcentric effort, the sizeprinciple can be short circuited.There is evidence that in a ballisticlift, synaptic-input systemscause the preferential recruitmentof high-threshold motor unitswhile inhibiting lower thresholdmotor units (15).

Accordingly,smaller fibers are bypassed infavor of those with greater forcepotential. Although small fibersdon’t have the ultimate growthpotential of larger fibers, they do,to a certain extent, contribute tomuscle hypertrophy. Therefore,because of a reduced involvementof low-threshold neurons, the potentialfor muscular developmentis ultimately diminished.

Second, the secretion of endogenous,anabolic hormones ishighest after a moderate-repetitionset (8). After a muscle hasbeen subjected to intense stress,68 Strength and Conditioning Journal December 2000these hormones help to instigatethe growth process. As a rule, thegreater the amount of circulatinganabolic hormones, the greaterthe potential for increases in muscularhypertrophy.It is theorized that lactic acidplays a central role in exercise-relatedhormonal excitation (11).

Althoughmany people tend think oflactic acid as an impediment toexercise, it is actually a potent anabolicfacilitator. Lactic acid isgenerated as a byproduct of glycolysis,the energy system that isthe primary fuel source used duringmoderate-repetition training.When lactic acid accumulates inlarge amounts, there is a correspondingsurge in anabolic hormonelevels.

Conversely, becauselow-repetition training predominantlyrelies on the short-termphosphocreatine system for energy-not on glycolysis-only a limitedamount of lactic acid is produced.Hence, the secretion ofendogenous hormones is somewhatblunted.Testosterone levels, for example,are significantly higher after a10-repetition set when comparedwith the case after a 1-repetitionmaximum (3).

Although the exactmechanism is still unclear, lacticacid somehow potentiates the releaseof cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP)-a chemicalmessenger that acts a catalyst incellular function. cAMP, in turn,promotes the secretion of testosterone,which then directly acts onthe muscle cell to stimulategrowth (9).

In addition, lactate has a significantimpact on growth hormone(GH) secretion. A 10-repetitionset has been shown toproduce large increases in circulatingGH-much greater than ina lower-repetition protocol (6).Moreover, these effects are fairlywell sustained; they are seen formore than an hour after the workout(7). And the benefits of thisare twofold: not only is GH itself apowerful stimulator of musculargrowth, but it also mediates therelease of insulin-like growth factor(specifically, IGF-1), perhapsthe most potent of all anabolichormones.

Third, moderate-repetitiontraining augments myofibrilar hydration(14). During training, theveins taking blood out of workingmuscles collapse. However, thearteries continue to deliver bloodinto the muscles, creating an increasedconcentration of intramuscularblood plasma.

Thiscauses plasma to seep out of thecapillaries and into the interstitialspaces (the area between musclecells and blood vessels). Thebuildup of fluid in the interstitialspaces causes an extracellularpressure gradient, which causes aflow of plasma back into the muscle.The net result: blood pools inyour muscles, causing the phenomenoncommonly referred to asa “pump.”People tend to think of apump as a temporary conditionthat is strictly cosmetic.

However,this belief is shortsighted. Numerousstudies have demonstratedthat a hydrated cell stimulatesprotein synthesis and inhibitsproteolysis (protein breakdown; 4,10, 13). In this way, muscles areprovided with the raw materials tolay down new contractile proteins-the basis for muscle tissuegrowth. Unfortunately, duringlow-repetition training, the timeunder tension simply isn’t sufficientto generate a pump. Consequently,cell volume is relativelyconstant, and the impetus forprotein synthesis is thereby reduced.

Fourth, by increasing timeunder tension, a moderate-repetitionset maximizes muscle damage-a fact that has been shownto be imperative to increases inmuscular hypertrophy (2). Theoretically,the longer that crossbridgeformation is maintainedduring training, the greater thepotential for damage to the tissue.Because the duration of crossbridgeformation is shorter in alow-repetition set than in a moderate-repetition set, there is lesstime for myofilamental damage totake place.It is important to note thatthese concepts are predicated onthe overload principle, whichstates that a muscle must betaxed beyond its present capacityfor growth to occur (5).

Hence, allsets (excluding warm-ups) shouldbe performed at a high level of intensity.This is an essential factorfor promoting gains in size andstrength (1, 12). Clearly, withoutmuscular overload, results will becompromised.In final analysis, there is substantialevidence that training in amoderate-repetition range is thesuperior method for buildingmuscular mass.

As discussed, itoptimizes fiber recruitment, increaseshormonal response, enhancescellular hydration, andheightens myofilamental damage.These factors work synergistically,combining to stimulate musculargrowth. But does this meanthat lower repetitions shouldnever be employed in a massbuildingprogram? Certainly not.Low-repetition sets can help toimprove neuromuscular response,which in turn can translateinto the ability to use heavierweights.

Similarly, some high-repetitionsets can also be employedto refine muscular endurance andraise lactate threshold. Still, ifmass is your goal, the majority oftraining should be performed in aglycolytic mode, keeping repetitionsbetween 8 to 10 per set.

sDecember 2000 Strength and Conditioning Journal 69n

References

1. Atha, J. Strengthening muscle.Exerc. Sport Sci. Rev.9:1-73. 1981.2. Evans, W.J., et al. The metaboliceffects of exercise-inducedmuscle damage. Exerc.Sport Sci. Rev. 19(-HD-):99-125. 1991.3. Hakkinen, K., et al. Acutehormonal responses to twodifferent fatiguing heavy-resistanceprotocols in maleathletes. J. Appl. Physiol.74(2):882-887. 1993.4. Häussinger, D., et al. Cellularhydration state: An importantdeterminant of proteincatabolism in health and disease.Lancet. 341(8856):1330-1332. 1993.5. Hellebrandt, F.A., et al.Mechanisms of muscle trainingin man: Experimentaldemonstration of the overloadprinciple. Phys. Ther.Rev. 36:371-383. 1956.6. Kraemer, W.J., et al. Hormonaland growth factor responsesto heavy resistanceexercise protocols. J. Appl.Physiol. 69(4):1442-1450.1990.7. Kraemer, W.J. et al. Endogenousanabolic hormonal andgrowth factor responses toheavy resistance exercise inmales and females. Int. J.Sports Med. 12(2):228-235.1991.8. Kraemer, W.J. et al. Changesin hormonal concentrationsafter different heavy-resistanceexercise protocols inwomen. J. Appl. Physiol.75(2):594-604. 1993.9. Lu, S.S., et al. Lactate andthe effects of exercise ontestosterone secretion: Evidencefor the involvement ofa cAMP-mediated mechanism.Med. Sci. Sports Exerc.29(8):1048-1054. 1997.10. Millar, I.D., et al. Mammaryprotein synthesis is acutelyregulated by the cellular hydrationstate. Biochem. Biophys.Res. Commun. 230(2):351-355. 1997.11. Roemmich, J.N. et al. Exerciseand growth hormone:Does one affect the other? J.Pediatr. 131(1 Pt 2):S75-S80.1997.12. Rooney, et al. Fatigue contributesto the strengthtraining stimulus. Med. Sci.Sports Exer. 26(9):1160-1164. 1994.13. Waldegger, S., et al. Effect ofcellular hydration on proteinmetabolism. Miner. ElectrolyteMetab. 23(3-6):201-205. 1997.14. Wilmore, J.H., et al. Physiologyof Sport and Exercise(2nd ed.). Champaign, IL:Human Kinetics, 1999.15. Zehr, E.P., et al. Ballisticmovement: Muscle activationand neuromuscular adaptation.Can. J. Appl. Physiol.19(4):363-378. 1994.SchoenfeldBrad Schoenfeld, CSCS, is theowner and founder of the PersonalTraining Center for Women inScarsdale, NY. He is author of thebook, Sculpting Her Body Perfect.

 

Dezembro 2000 Jornal Força e condicionamento

Associação Nacional de Força e Condicionamento

Volume 22, número 6, página 67 a 69.

REPETIÇÕES E MÚSCULOS

Por: Nino Antônio Severiano (Nino Severiano)

Brad Schoenfeld, CSCS

Centro de Personal Training para mulheres

Scarsdale, New York

Palavras chave: repetições, massa muscular.

Muitos fatores de exercícios relacionados influenciam a massa muscular. Entre eles está a escala repetição – a quantidade de repetições executada durante uma série. Infelizmente, este é um dos aspectos mais mal compreendidos do treinamento.As maiorias das pessoas fazem idéia de que o uso de um número elevado de repetições (no máximo 15 por série) é submáximo, por aumentar a massa muscular. A razão para isto é simples: durante uma série de alta repetição, os pesos usados não são pesados o bastante para inervar as unidades motoras de ponto inicial mais alta.

Estas unidades motoras controlam as fibras de contração rápidas, fibras do tipo IIB – aquelas que têm o maior potencial o crescimento. E a maioria do trabalho é realizada por fibras de contração lenta, do tipo I, que são resistentes a fatiga, mas têm uma habilidade limitada à hipertrofia. Assim, embora o treinamento de alta repetição seja uma excelente abordagem, por aumentar a resistência muscular localizada e por melhorar a qualidade do tecido do músculo, ele produz somente ganhos mínimos no tamanho muscular.

Por outro lado, há uma noção falsa predominante de que, para aumentar a massa muscular, é necessário treinar como um halterofilista, usando cargas extremamente pesadas e baixas repetições (menos de 5 por série). É comum testemunhar um aspirante a halterofilista levantar a barra executar séries de agachamentos ou de leg-press,próximo de seu 1 RM.

Esta abordagem, entretanto, é contrária aos princípios estabelecidos da fisiologia do exercício. Por uma série de razões, um esquema de repetição moderada (aproximadamente 8 a 10 repetições por série) é decididamente a melhor escolha para alcançar ganhos ótimos em massa muscular.

Primeiro, treinar em uma escala do repetição moderada estimula a ativação de um número máximo de fibras do músculo. Isto se deve ao princípio do tamanho do recrutamento muscular, que dita que as unidades motoras são inervadas em uma forma ordenada. As unidades menores do motor são ativadas primeiro. Quando uma série se torna mais intensa, as unidades motoras maiores são ativadas progressivamente, até que todas as fibras disponíveis sejam recrutadas.

Este é o teste padrão geral do recrutamento visto durante o treinamento de repetição moderada; ele permite que o especto cheiode fibras exerça força. Alternativamente, como o treinamento de baixa repetição requer um esforço concêntrico explosivo, o princípio do tamanho pode ser de circuito curto. Há evidências de que em um levantamento balístico, sistemas de estímulos sinápticos causem o recrutamento preferencial de unidades motoras de limiar mais altas, ao inibir unidades motoras de limiar mais baixas (15).

Alternativamente, as fibras menores são desviadas ultrapassadas em favor daquelas com potencial de força maior. Embora as fibras pequenas não tenham o potencial de crescimento final básico das fibras maiores, de certa forma contribuem para a hipertrofia do músculo. Conseqüentemente, por causa de uma participação reduzida dos neurônios de ponto inicial baixo, o potencial para o desenvolvimento muscular é diminuído definitivamente.

Segundo, a secreção de hormônios endógenos anabólicos é mais elevada depois de uma série de repetição moderada (8). Após um músculo ser exposto a força intensa, estes hormônios ajudam a incitar o processo do crescimento.Como regra, quanto maior a quantidade de hormônios anabólicos circulantes, maior o potencial para aumentos na hipertrofia muscular. Existe a teoria de que o ácido lático desempenha um papel fundamental no estímulo hormonal de exercício-relacionado (11).

Embora muitas pessoas tendem a pensar no ácido láctico como um impedimento ao exercício, ele é realmente um facilitador anabólico potente. O ácido láctico é produzido como um subproduto da glicólise, o sistema de energia que é a fonte primária de combustível usada durante o treinamento de repetição moderada. Quando o ácido lático se acumula em grandes quantidades, há um surto correspondente em níveis hormonais anabólicos.

Inversamente, como o treinamento de baixa repetição conta predominantemente com o sistema de fosfocreatinade curto prazo para energia – não com a glicólise – apenas uma quantidade limitada de ácido lático é produzida. Portanto, a secreção de hormônio endógeno é, de certa forma, brusca. Os níveis de testosterona, por exemplo, são significativamente mais elevados depois de uma série de 10 repetições, quando comparados com a situação após 1 RM (3).

Embora o mecanismo exato ainda não seja claro, o ácido lático potencializa, de certa forma, a liberação do monofosfato de adenosina cíclico (cAMP) – um mensageiro químico que representa um catalisador na função celular. O cAMP, por sua vez, promove a secreção da testosterona, a qual age diretamente na célula muscular para estimular o crescimento (9).

Além disso, o lactato tem um impacto significativo na secreção do hormônio do crescimento (GH). Uma série de 10 repetições tem se mostrado como produtora de grandes aumentos na circulação do GH – bem maior que em um protocolode baixa-repetição (6). Além disso, estes efeitos são razoavelmente bem sustentados; eles são vistos por mais de uma hora após o exercício (7). E os benefícios disto são duplos: o próprio GH não é apenas um estimulador poderoso do crescimento muscular, ele também intermédia a liberação da insulina – como o fator de crescimento (especificamente, IGF-1), talvezo mais potente de todos os hormônios anabólicos.

Terceiro, o treinamento de repetição moderada aumenta a hidratação miofibrilar (14). Durante o treinamento, as veias estão obtendo sangue dos músculos de trabalho. Entretanto, as artérias continuam a entregar o sangue dentro dos músculos, criando uma concentração aumentada do plasma sanguíneo intramuscular.

Isto faz com que o plasma escoe fora dos capilares e dentro dos espaços intercelulares (a área entre células musculares e os vasos sanguíneos). O acúmulo do líquido nos espaços intercelulares provoca uma pressão extracelular declinante, que provoca um fluxo do plasma de volta para o músculo. O resultado líquido: sangue em seus músculos, causando o fenômeno geralmente conhecido como “bomba”. As pessoas tendem a pensar na bomba como uma condição provisória que seja estritamente estética.

Entretanto, esta opinião é de visão curta. Numerosos estudos demonstraram que uma célula hidratada estimula a síntese da proteína e inibe a proteólise (quebra da proteína; 4, 10, 13). Desta forma, os músculos são abastecidos de matérias-primas para colocar novas proteínas contráteis – a base para o crescimento do tecido muscular. Infelizmente, durante o treinamento de baixa repetição, o tempo sob tensão simplesmente não é suficiente para gerar uma bomba. Conseqüentemente, o volume da célula é relativamente constante, e o ímpeto para a síntese da proteína é, desta forma, reduzida.

Quarto, aumentando o tempo sob tensão, uma série de repetição moderada maximiza o dano muscular – fato que tem se mostrado imperativo para aumentos na hipertrofia muscular (2). Teoricamente, quanto mais a formação da ligação se mantém durante o treinamento, maior o potencial para danificar o tecido. Como a duração da formação da ligaçãoé mais curta em uma série de baixa repetição do que em uma série de moderada repetição, existe menos tempo para os danos musculares ocorrerem. É importante observar que estes conceitos estão previstos no princípio da sobrecarga, que estabelece que um músculo deve exigido além de sua capacidade atual para que o crescimento ocorra (5).

Portanto, todas as séries (excluindo os aquecimentos) deveriam ser executadas em nível elevado de intensidade. Este é um fator essencial para promover ganhos no tamanho e na força (1, 12). Claramente, sem a sobrecarga muscular, os resultados serão comprometidos. Na análise final, há evidências substanciais de que treinar em uma escala de repetição moderada é o método superior para construir a massa muscular.

Como discutido isto otimiza o recrutamento da fibra, aumenta a resposta hormonal, realça a hidratação celular, e aumenta os danos musculares. Estes fatores trabalham sinergeticamente, combinando-se para estimular o crescimento muscular. Mas isto significa que repetições mais baixas nunca deveriam ser empregadas em um programa de hipertrofia? Certamente não. As séries de baixa repetição podem ajudar a melhorar a resposta neuromuscular, que por sua vez pode traduzir-se na habilidade de usar cargas mais pesadas.

Similarmente, algumas séries de alta repetição podem também ser empregadas para refinar a resistência muscular e aumentar a resistência de limiar de lactato. Ainda, se hipertrofia for seu objetivo, a maioria dos treinamentos devem ser executados em uma modalidade glicolitica, mantendo repetições de 8 a 10, por série.

Referências

1. Atha, J. Strengthening muscle.Exerc. Sport Sci. Rev.9:1-73. 1981.2. Evans, W.J., et al. The metaboliceffects of exercise-inducedmuscle damage. Exerc.Sport Sci. Rev. 19(-HD-):99-125. 1991.3. Hakkinen, K., et al. Acutehormonal responses to twodifferent fatiguing heavy-resistanceprotocols in maleathletes. J. Appl. Physiol.74(2):882-887. 1993.4. Häussinger, D., et al. Cellularhydration state: An importantdeterminant of proteincatabolism in health and disease.Lancet. 341(8856):1330-1332. 1993.5. Hellebrandt, F.A., et al.Mechanisms of muscle trainingin man: Experimentaldemonstration of the overloadprinciple. Phys. Ther.Rev. 36:371-383. 1956.6. Kraemer, W.J., et al. Hormonaland growth factor responsesto heavy resistanceexercise protocols. J. Appl.Physiol. 69(4):1442-1450.1990.7. Kraemer, W.J. et al. Endogenousanabolic hormonal andgrowth factor responses toheavy resistance exercise inmales and females. Int. J.Sports Med. 12(2):228-235.1991.8. Kraemer, W.J. et al. Changesin hormonal concentrationsafter different heavy-resistanceexercise protocols inwomen. J. Appl. Physiol.75(2):594-604. 1993.9. Lu, S.S., et al. Lactate andthe effects of exercise ontestosterone secretion: Evidencefor the involvement ofa cAMP-mediated mechanism.Med. Sci. Sports Exerc.29(8):1048-1054. 1997.10. Millar, I.D., et al. Mammaryprotein synthesis is acutelyregulated by the cellular hydrationstate. Biochem. Biophys.Res. Commun. 230(2):351-355. 1997.11. Roemmich, J.N. et al. Exerciseand growth hormone:Does one affect the other? J.Pediatr. 131(1 Pt 2):S75-S80.1997.12. Rooney, et al. Fatigue contributesto the strengthtraining stimulus. Med. Sci.Sports Exer. 26(9):1160-1164. 1994.13. Waldegger, S., et al. Effect ofcellular hydration on proteinmetabolism. Miner. ElectrolyteMetab. 23(3-6):201-205. 1997.14. Wilmore, J.H., et al. Physiologyof Sport and Exercise(2nd ed.). Champaign, IL:Human Kinetics, 1999.15. Zehr, E.P., et al. Ballisticmovement: Muscle activationand neuromuscular adaptation.Can. J. Appl. Physiol.19(4):363-378. 1994.SchoenfeldBrad Schoenfeld, CSCS, is theowner and founder of the PersonalTraining Center for Women inScarsdale, NY. He is author of thebook, Sculpting Her Body Perfect.

Anúncios

Deixe um comentário

Preencha os seus dados abaixo ou clique em um ícone para log in:

Logotipo do WordPress.com

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta WordPress.com. Sair /  Alterar )

Foto do Google+

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Google+. Sair /  Alterar )

Imagem do Twitter

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Twitter. Sair /  Alterar )

Foto do Facebook

Você está comentando utilizando sua conta Facebook. Sair /  Alterar )

Conectando a %s